HAROLD TOWN "CHILD'S PUNCHOUT" 1971 SILKSCREEN
HAROLD TOWN "CHILD'S PUNCHOUT" 1971 SILKSCREEN
HAROLD TOWN "CHILD'S PUNCHOUT" 1971 SILKSCREEN
HAROLD TOWN "CHILD'S PUNCHOUT" 1971 SILKSCREEN
HAROLD TOWN "CHILD'S PUNCHOUT" 1971 SILKSCREEN
HAROLD TOWN "CHILD'S PUNCHOUT" 1971 SILKSCREEN
HAROLD TOWN "CHILD'S PUNCHOUT" 1971 SILKSCREEN
HAROLD TOWN "CHILD'S PUNCHOUT" 1971 SILKSCREEN
HAROLD TOWN "CHILD'S PUNCHOUT" 1971 SILKSCREEN
HAROLD TOWN "CHILD'S PUNCHOUT" 1971 SILKSCREEN
HAROLD TOWN "CHILD'S PUNCHOUT" 1971 SILKSCREEN
HAROLD TOWN "CHILD'S PUNCHOUT" 1971 SILKSCREEN
HAROLD TOWN "CHILD'S PUNCHOUT" 1971 SILKSCREEN
HAROLD TOWN "CHILD'S PUNCHOUT" 1971 SILKSCREEN
HAROLD TOWN "CHILD'S PUNCHOUT" 1971 SILKSCREEN

HAROLD TOWN "CHILD'S PUNCHOUT" 1971 SILKSCREEN

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Harold Town (1924-1990) is renowned in Canada for his prolific, versatile and dynamic body of work. 

He was dubbed the "Picasso of Canada" for his ever-changing aesthetic and perennial creativity.

In the mid 1950's he established his reputation with a series of monotypes (called "Single Autographic Prints") which included elements of collage.

While Town became one of the leading artists of the Painters 11 group, he had a important and lifelong connection to printmaking.  

During most of the 1960's Town was occupied by painting, beginning in 1968 he began another important chapter in his career as a printmaker. For a period of about 3 years Town created large silkscreens, mostly on 40" x 29" paper in bold exuberant colors. The "Stretch" works are the most famous silkscreens from this era.

This work differed from the "Stretch" works in several ways. Besides the complexity of composition and the inclusion of text, these works were the result of an elaborate process. The silkscreens were made from hand-cut screens, one for each color. While the "Stretch" works were two colors, these works were upwards of seven. In "Child's Punchout" we see the bubble-gum pink, cinnabar,navy, grey, lime, peach and cream. 

At first glance, the overall composition seems to be an abstract with almost psychedelic elements. On closer inspection we see that the forms are stylized versions of perhaps circus performers: "Seal", "Dog Stands on a Ball", "Trapeze Artist" etc. 

This is a prime example of Town's dynamism, creativity and exuberant colors. 

Provenance: The Estate of Harold Town 

Additional images available on request. 

Questions about this piece? Contact us or call +1.416.704.1720

Signed and numbered by the artist.

From an edition of 99

Silkscreen.

Canada, 1971

29"H 40"W 

Very good condition.