HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972
HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972
HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972
HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972
HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972
HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972
HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972
HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972
HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972
HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972
HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972
HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972
HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972
HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972
HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972
HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972
HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972
HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972

HELEN FRANKENTHALER, “SPOLETO”, SCREENPRINT 1972

$5,000

Helen Frankenthaler (1928-2011) is one of the most revered and influential abstract painters of the 20th century, in addition to being one of the most successful and collected female artists.  

Frankenthaler is credited with the evolution (or demise) of Abstract Expressionism. Elaborating on techniques made famous by Jackson Pollock, specifically pouring paint directly on to (frequently) unprimed canvas, Frankenthaler was the driving force of the next major movement in American abstraction: Color Field painting. 

This screenprint is a fantastic example of both her aesthetic and her work as a printmaker. It is a reminder of her mastery of negative space, her use of color, and shapes that may or may not be sexualized.  

"Spoleto" evokes the era's most popular school of painting (Color Field) while anticipating the trends towards minimalism. One of Frankenthaler's attributes was her curiosity and courage for using color. In "Spoleto" fushia, cinnabar and kelly green forms float on a hypnotic yellow background. 

We love this work for its freedom, spontaneity and simplicity - yet its conveys many of the characteristics found in Frankenthaler's largest and most elaborate canvases. 

Questions about this product? Contact us or call+1.416.704.1720

Screenprint 

Signed, dated and numbered by the artist in pencil 

From an edition of 100

USA, 1972

40"H 29”W (work)

47.5"H 38"W (frame)

Excellent condition

Additional images available by request.