SAM FRANCIS "TURN" SCREENPRINT, 1972
SAM FRANCIS "TURN" SCREENPRINT, 1972
SAM FRANCIS "TURN" SCREENPRINT, 1972
SAM FRANCIS "TURN" SCREENPRINT, 1972
SAM FRANCIS "TURN" SCREENPRINT, 1972
SAM FRANCIS "TURN" SCREENPRINT, 1972
SAM FRANCIS "TURN" SCREENPRINT, 1972
SAM FRANCIS "TURN" SCREENPRINT, 1972
SAM FRANCIS "TURN" SCREENPRINT, 1972
SAM FRANCIS "TURN" SCREENPRINT, 1972
SAM FRANCIS "TURN" SCREENPRINT, 1972
SAM FRANCIS "TURN" SCREENPRINT, 1972
SAM FRANCIS "TURN" SCREENPRINT, 1972

SAM FRANCIS "TURN" SCREENPRINT, 1972

$3,500

A preeminent figure in 20th century abstraction, Sam Francis (1923-1994) is renowned for his dynamic and colorful works.

After his military service, Francis returned to California and received a Masters of Arts from Cal Berkeley in 1950. Taking advantage of the G.I. bill, Francis moved to Paris to further his education and devote himself to art making. This was a fortuitous move and by 1956, Times Magazine called him “The hottest American painter in Paris".

Exposed to world-renowned collections of art, Francis’ aesthetic was informed by French impressionists, Canada’s own Jean-Peal Riopelle, and other American artists based in France such as Al Held and Joan Mitchell. This diverse exposure continued as Francis travelled and held studios in continental Europe, Japan, Mexico, and the US during a forty-year period.

Francis is typically considered an important member of the second generation of Abstract Expressionism. His work is easily recognizable for its vibrant saturated colors, its gestural arrangements and frequent open or untouched spaces. 

Francis was featured in Clement Greenberg’s milestone exhibition, “Post Painterly Abstraction” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1964, alongside American artists including Jackson Pollock, Frank Stella, and Morris Louis.

Like many of his contemporaries, the artist, experimented extensively with printmaking. He would open his own printing studio in 1973, a year prior to the creation of “Turn”.

Click here to see another example of Francis’ prints, located at the Whitney Museum of American Art. 

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Color screen print on Arjomari paper

Printed and published by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles 

Signed and numbered in pencil in lower margin

From an edition of 70

25”H  31.25"W (work)

28.75"H 35.5"W (framed)

Excellent condition

Note: this work is framed with plexiglass